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With over 145 dishes to choose from and multiple AA Rosette Awards,
Thai Edge offers the very finest Thai dining experience in the UK today.

The relaxing surroundings feature genuine Thai décor and set the perfect scene to experience our varied and delightful menu.

Thai dining at its absolute finest

With over 145 dishes to choose from and multiple AA Rosette Awards, Thai Edge offers the very finest Thai dining experience in the UK today. The relaxing surroundings feature genuine Thai décor and set the perfect scene to experience our varied and delightful menu.

Welcome to Thai Edge restaurant

Our extensive menu, available in Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds and Cardiff, with over 145 dishes was awarded an AA rosette by the AA Restaurant Guide back in 2002. The extraordinary creations on offer range from dishes with subtle sophisticated flavours to spicy hot ones. All our dishes are crafted by chefs who have perfected their technique through years of experience. Thai Edge sets a high standard to offer the discerning diner an exemplary fine dining experience. They have perfected the balance between contemporary Oriental design, traditional Thai service and great tasting food.

So if you desire a warm, welcoming atmosphere that takes you on a journey through Thailand’s rich culinary heritage then Thai Edge is a must!

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Northern shared dishes A selection of Northern Thai dishes, served as startersTam som-oKaeng hang-le – a Burmese-influenced stewed pork curry which uses peanuts, dried chilies, tamarind juice and curry paste in the recipe, but containing no coconut milk.
Kaeng khae – is a spicy northern Thai curry of herbs, vegetables, the leaves of an acacia tree (cha-om) and meat (chicken, water buffalo, pork or frog). It also does not contain any coconut milk.
Kaeng khanun – a curry of pork stewed with green jackfruit, which is very popular in the region. Like all northern Thai curries, it does not contain any coconut milk.
Kaeng pa – better known as “Jungle Curry” internationally. Traditionally made with wild boar, most often pork or chicken is used nowadays.Kaep mu – deep fried crispy pork rinds which often eaten with chili pastes such as nam phrik num but also eaten as a snack on their own.Larb Lanna – drier and smokier in taste, Northern Thai larb does not contain lime or fish sauce. Instead it’s flavoured and seasoned with an elaborate mix of ground dried chillies, dried spices like cumin, cloves, long pepper, star anise, Sichuan pepper, cinnamon, and occasionally blood of the animal used.Nam phrik kha – thick relish made with roasted chilies, garlic, galangal and salt. This northern Thai specialty is often served as a dip for steamed mushrooms.
Nam phrik num – a chili paste of pounded large green chilies, shallots, garlic, coriander leaves, lime juice and fish sauce; eaten with steamed and raw vegetables, and sticky rice.
Nam phrik ong – resembling a thick Bolognese sauce, it is made with dried chilies, minced pork and tomato; eaten with steamed and raw vegetables, and sticky rice.
Sai ua – a grilled sausage of ground pork mixed with spices and herbs; it is often served with chopped fresh ginger and chilies at a meal. It is also sold at markets in Chiang Mai as a snack.
Tam som-o – a salad made from the slightly pounded flesh of a pomelo fruit, which is mixed with garlic, sliced lemongrass, and a thick pungent black paste (nam pu) made from boiling down the juices and meat of rice-paddy crab.Central Thai shared dishesHo mok pla, fish curry pâtéPla sam rothot man pla krai, served with fried basil
Yam pla duk fuChuchi pla kaphong – snapper in chuchi curry sauce (thick red curry sauce)
Kai phat khing – chicken stir-fried with sliced ginger.
Kaeng khiao wan – called “green curry” in English, it is a coconut curry made with fresh green chillies and flavoured with Thai basil, and chicken or fish meatballs. This dish can be one of the spiciest of Thai curries.
Ho mok pla – a pâté or soufflé of fish, spices, coconut milk and egg, steamed in a banana leaf cup and topped with thick coconut cream before serving.
Kaeng phanaeng – a mild creamy coconut curry with beef (Phanaeng nuea), chicken, or pork. It includes some roasted dried spices similar to Kaeng matsaman.
Kaeng phet (lit. ‘spicy curry’) – also known as red curry in English, it is a coconut curry made with copious amounts of dried red chillies in the curry paste.
Kaeng som (Thai: ??????) – a hot and sour soup/curry usually eaten together with rice
Kai phat met mamuang himmaphan – The Thai Chinese version of the Sichuan style chicken with cashews known as Kung Pao chicken, fried with whole dried chilies.
Miang kham – dried shrimp and other ingredients wrapped in cha plu leaves; often eaten as a snack or a starter.
Phak bung fai daeng – stir fried morning glory with yellow bean paste.
Phat khana mu krop – khana (gailan) stir fried with crispy pork.
Phat kaphrao – beef, pork, prawns or chicken stir fried with Thai holy basil, chillies and garlic; for instance kai phat kaphrao (Thai: ????????????), with minced chicken.
Phat phak ruam – stir fried combination of vegetables depending on availability and preference.
Phat phrik – usually beef stir fried with chilli, called Nuea phat phrik (Thai: ????????????).
Pla nueng manao – steamed fish with a spicy lime juice dressing.
Pla sam rot – literally “Three flavours fish”: deep fried fish with a sweet, tangy and spicy tamarind sauce.
Pu cha – a mixture of cooked crab meat, pork, garlic and pepper, deep fried inside the crab shells and served with a simple spicy sauce, such as Sri Rachaa sauce, sweet-hot garlic sauce, nam phrik phao (Thai: ??????????, roasted chilli paste), nam chim buai (Thai: ???????????, plum sauce), or in a red curry paste, with chopped green onions. It is sometimes also served as deep fried patties instead of being fried in the crab shell.
Suki – a Thai variant of the Chinese hot pot.
Thot man – deep fried fishcake made from knifefish (Thot man pla krai, Thai: ?????????????) or shrimp (Thot man kung, Thai
Tom chuet wun sen or Kaeng chuet wunsen – a clear soup with vegetables and wunsen (cellophane noodles made from mung bean).
Tom kha kai – hot spicy soup with coconut milk, galangal and chicken.
Tom yam – hot & sour soup with meat. With shrimp it is called Tom yam goong or Tom yam kung (Thai: ?????????), with seafood (typically shrimp, squid, fish) Tom yam thale (Thai: ?????????), with chicken Tom yam kai (Thai: ????????).
Yam – general name for many different kinds of sour Thai salads, such as those made with glass noodles (Yam wunsen, Thai: ??????????), with seafood (Yam thale, Thai: ??????), or grilled beef (Yam nuea Thai: ???????). The dressing of a “Yam” will normally consist of shallots, fish sauce, tomato, lime juice, sugar, chilies and Thai celery (khuenchai, Thai: ????????) or coriander.
Yam pla duk fu – crispy fried catfish with a spicy, sweet-and-sour, green mango salad.
Northeastern shared dishes
The cuisine of Northeastern Thailand generally feature dishes similar to those found in Laos, as Isan people historically have close ties with Lao culture and speak a language that is generally mutually intelligible with the Lao language.Mu yang with Nam chim chaeo: grilled neck of pork with a chili dip
Kai yang – marinated, grilled chicken.
Khao niao – Sticky rice is eaten as a staple food both in the Northeast as in the North of Thailand; it is traditionally steamed.
Mu ping – marinated, grilled pork on a stick.
Pad mhee korat – a stir-fried rice noodle thai style dish commonly served with papaya salad (somtum) in Thailand. Dried rice oodle (many colors) is a specific ingredient for pad mhee korat. It is made with dried rice noodle, garlic, shallot, pork, salt soya bean, fish suce, palm sugar, redpepper, dark soy sauce, ripe tmarind, water, spring onion and bean sprouts.
Lap – a traditional Lao salad containing meat, onions, chillies, roasted rice powder and garnished with mint.
Nam chim chaeo – is a sticky, sweet and spicy dipping sauce made with dried chilies, fish sauce, palm sugar and black roasted rice flour. It is often served as a dip with mu yang (grilled pork).
Nam tok – made with pork (mu) or beef (nuea) and somewhat identical to lap, except that the pork or beef is cut into thin strips rather than minced.
Som tam – grated green papaya salad, pounded with a mortar and pestle, similar to the Lao Tam mak hoong. There are three main variations: som tam pu (Thai: ???????) with salted black crab, and som tam Thai (Thai: ????????) with peanuts, dried shrimp and palm sugar and som tam pla ra (Thai: ???????????) from the northeastern part of Thailand (Isan), with salted gourami fish, white eggplants, fish sauce and long beans. Som tam is usually eaten with sticky rice but a popular variation is to serve it with khanom chin (rice noodles) instead.
Suea rong hai – grilled beef brisket.
Tom saep – Northeastern-style hot & sour soup.
Yam naem, a snack made of crumbled crisp rice balls, minced pork, ginger, green chillies, peanuts and onion.Northern shared dishes A selection of Northern Thai dishes, served as startersTam som-oKaeng hang-le – a Burmese-influenced stewed pork curry which uses peanuts, dried chilies, tamarind juice and curry paste in the recipe, but containing no coconut milk.
Kaeng khae – is a spicy northern Thai curry of herbs, vegetables, the leaves of an acacia tree (cha-om) and meat (chicken, water buffalo, pork or frog). It also does not contain any coconut milk.
Kaeng khanun – a curry of pork stewed with green jackfruit, which is very popular in the region. Like all northern Thai curries, it does not contain any coconut milk.
Kaeng pa – better known as “Jungle Curry” internationally. Traditionally made with wild boar, most often pork or chicken is used nowadays.Kaep mu – deep fried crispy pork rinds which often eaten with chili pastes such as nam phrik num but also eaten as a snack on their own.Larb Lanna – drier and smokier in taste, Northern Thai larb does not contain lime or fish sauce. Instead it’s flavoured and seasoned with an elaborate mix of ground dried chillies, dried spices like cumin, cloves, long pepper, star anise, Sichuan pepper, cinnamon, and occasionally blood of the animal used.Nam phrik kha – thick relish made with roasted chilies, garlic, galangal and salt. This northern Thai specialty is often served as a dip for steamed mushrooms.
Nam phrik num – a chili paste of pounded large green chilies, shallots, garlic, coriander leaves, lime juice and fish sauce; eaten with steamed and raw vegetables, and sticky rice.
Nam phrik ong – resembling a thick Bolognese sauce, it is made with dried chilies, minced pork and tomato; eaten with steamed and raw vegetables, and sticky rice.
Sai ua – a grilled sausage of ground pork mixed with spices and herbs; it is often served with chopped fresh ginger and chilies at a meal. It is also sold at markets in Chiang Mai as a snack.
Tam som-o – a salad made from the slightly pounded flesh of a pomelo fruit, which is mixed with garlic, sliced lemongrass, and a thick pungent black paste (nam pu) made from boiling down the juices and meat of rice-paddy crab.Central Thai shared dishesHo mok pla, fish curry pâtéPla sam rothot man pla krai, served with fried basil
Yam pla duk fuChuchi pla kaphong – snapper in chuchi curry sauce (thick red curry sauce)
Kai phat khing – chicken stir-fried with sliced ginger.
Kaeng khiao wan – called “green curry” in English, it is a coconut curry made with fresh green chillies and flavoured with Thai basil, and chicken or fish meatballs. This dish can be one of the spiciest of Thai curries.
Ho mok pla – a pâté or soufflé of fish, spices, coconut milk and egg, steamed in a banana leaf cup and topped with thick coconut cream before serving.
Kaeng phanaeng – a mild creamy coconut curry with beef (Phanaeng nuea), chicken, or pork. It includes some roasted dried spices similar to Kaeng matsaman.
Kaeng phet (lit. ‘spicy curry’) – also known as red curry in English, it is a coconut curry made with copious amounts of dried red chillies in the curry paste.
Kaeng som (Thai: ??????) – a hot and sour soup/curry usually eaten together with rice
Kai phat met mamuang himmaphan – The Thai Chinese version of the Sichuan style chicken with cashews known as Kung Pao chicken, fried with whole dried chilies.
Miang kham – dried shrimp and other ingredients wrapped in cha plu leaves; often eaten as a snack or a starter.
Phak bung fai daeng – stir fried morning glory with yellow bean paste.
Phat khana mu krop – khana (gailan) stir fried with crispy pork.
Phat kaphrao – beef, pork, prawns or chicken stir fried with Thai holy basil, chillies and garlic; for instance kai phat kaphrao (Thai: ????????????), with minced chicken.
Phat phak ruam – stir fried combination of vegetables depending on availability and preference.
Phat phrik – usually beef stir fried with chilli, called Nuea phat phrik (Thai: ????????????).
Pla nueng manao – steamed fish with a spicy lime juice dressing.
Pla sam rot – literally “Three flavours fish”: deep fried fish with a sweet, tangy and spicy tamarind sauce.
Pu cha – a mixture of cooked crab meat, pork, garlic and pepper, deep fried inside the crab shells and served with a simple spicy sauce, such as Sri Rachaa sauce, sweet-hot garlic sauce, nam phrik phao (Thai: ??????????, roasted chilli paste), nam chim buai (Thai: ???????????, plum sauce), or in a red curry paste, with chopped green onions. It is sometimes also served as deep fried patties instead of being fried in the crab shell.
Suki – a Thai variant of the Chinese hot pot.
Thot man – deep fried fishcake made from knifefish (Thot man pla krai, Thai: ?????????????) or shrimp (Thot man kung, Thai
Tom chuet wun sen or Kaeng chuet wunsen – a clear soup with vegetables and wunsen (cellophane noodles made from mung bean).
Tom kha kai – hot spicy soup with coconut milk, galangal and chicken.
Tom yam – hot & sour soup with meat. With shrimp it is called Tom yam goong or Tom yam kung (Thai: ?????????), with seafood (typically shrimp, squid, fish) Tom yam thale (Thai: ?????????), with chicken Tom yam kai (Thai: ????????).
Yam – general name for many different kinds of sour Thai salads, such as those made with glass noodles (Yam wunsen, Thai: ??????????), with seafood (Yam thale, Thai: ??????), or grilled beef (Yam nuea Thai: ???????). The dressing of a “Yam” will normally consist of shallots, fish sauce, tomato, lime juice, sugar, chilies and Thai celery (khuenchai, Thai: ????????) or coriander.
Yam pla duk fu – crispy fried catfish with a spicy, sweet-and-sour, green mango salad.
Northeastern shared dishes
The cuisine of Northeastern Thailand generally feature dishes similar to those found in Laos, as Isan people historically have close ties with Lao culture and speak a language that is generally mutually intelligible with the Lao language.Mu yang with Nam chim chaeo: grilled neck of pork with a chili dip
Kai yang – marinated, grilled chicken.
Khao niao – Sticky rice is eaten as a staple food both in the Northeast as in the North of Thailand; it is traditionally steamed.
Mu ping – marinated, grilled pork on a stick.
Pad mhee korat – a stir-fried rice noodle thai style dish commonly served with papaya salad (somtum) in Thailand. Dried rice oodle (many colors) is a specific ingredient for pad mhee korat. It is made with dried rice noodle, garlic, shallot, pork, salt soya bean, fish suce, palm sugar, redpepper, dark soy sauce, ripe tmarind, water, spring onion and bean sprouts.
Lap – a traditional Lao salad containing meat, onions, chillies, roasted rice powder and garnished with mint.
Nam chim chaeo – is a sticky, sweet and spicy dipping sauce made with dried chilies, fish sauce, palm sugar and black roasted rice flour. It is often served as a dip with mu yang (grilled pork).
Nam tok – made with pork (mu) or beef (nuea) and somewhat identical to lap, except that the pork or beef is cut into thin strips rather than minced.
Som tam – grated green papaya salad, pounded with a mortar and pestle, similar to the Lao Tam mak hoong. There are three main variations: som tam pu (Thai: ???????) with salted black crab, and som tam Thai (Thai: ????????) with peanuts, dried shrimp and palm sugar and som tam pla ra (Thai: ???????????) from the northeastern part of Thailand (Isan), with salted gourami fish, white eggplants, fish sauce and long beans. Som tam is usually eaten with sticky rice but a popular variation is to serve it with khanom chin (rice noodles) instead.
Suea rong hai – grilled beef brisket.
Tom saep – Northeastern-style hot & sour soup.
Yam naem, a snack made of crumbled crisp rice balls, minced pork, ginger, green chillies, peanuts and onion.Massaman curry, a dish which is very well received internationally.Thai cuisine only became well-known worldwide from the 1960s onwards, when Thailand became a destination for international tourism and American troops arrived in large numbers during the Vietnam War period. The number of Thai restaurants went up from four in 1970s London to between two and three hundred in less than 25 years. The Thaksin administration of Thailand (2001-2006) launched the “Kitchen of the World” campaign to promote Thai cuisine internationally, with a yearly budget of 500 million baht. It provided loans and training for restaurateurs seeking to establish Thai restaurants overseas; established the “Thai Select” certification program which encouraged the use of ingredients imported from Thailand; and promoted integration between Thai investors, Thai Airways, and the Tourism Authority of Thailand with Thai restaurants overseas.[43]One survey held in 2003 by the Kellogg School of Management and Sasin Institute showed that Thai cuisine ranked 4th when people were asked to name an ethnic cuisine, after Italian, French and Chinese cuisine. When asked “what is your favourite cuisine?”, Thailand’s cuisine came in at 6th place, behind the three aforementioned cuisines, and Indian and Japanese cuisine.[44]In the list of the “World’s 50 most delicious foods”, compiled by CNN in 2011, som tam stands at place 46, nam tok mu at 19, tom yam kung on 8, and massaman curry stands on first place as most delicious food in the world.[45] In a reader’s poll held a few months later by CNN, mu nam tok came in on place 36, Thai fried rice at 24, green curry stands on 19, massaman curry on place 10, and Thai som tam, pad Thai and tom yam kung hold places 6, 5 and 4.[46]Thai chefs in the name of Thailand Culinary Academy achieve second place in the Gourmet Team Challenge (Practical) of the FHC China International Culinary Arts Competition 14 at Shanghai, China in 14–16 November 2012.Thai chefs in the name of Thailand Culinary Academy win in the competition of IKA Culinary Olympic 2012 which was held in Erfurt, Germany between 5–10 October 2012. They received 4 golden medals and 1 silver medal.[47]Two restaurants that are specialised in Thai cuisine, but owned by non-Thai chefs, have received Michelin stars: “Nahm” in London, run by David Thompson received its star in 2002, and “Kiin Kiin” in Copenhagen, run by chef Henrik Yde-Andersen and Lertchai Treetawatchaiwong, received its in 2009. Currently, “Kiin Kiin” is the only Thai restaurant with a Michelin star. 2011, the prestigious James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef in Northwestern United States, was presented to Andy Ricker of restaurant “Pok Pok” in Portland, Oregon, and for Best Chef in Southwestern United States to Saipin Chutima of restaurant “Lotusof Siam” in Winchester, Nevada.Rice and noodles Khao niao (sticky rice), served with som tam (papaya salad) and kai yang (grilled chicken) as part of a typical Isan mealLike most other Asian cuisines, rice is the staple grain of Thai cuisine. According to McDang, rice is the first and most important part of any meal, and the words for rice and food are the same: khao. Highly prized, sweet-smelling jasmine rice (khao hom mali) is indigenous to Thailand. This naturally aromatic long-grained rice grows in abundance in the verdant patchwork of paddy fields that blanket Thailand’s central plains. Steamed rice is accompanied by highly aromatic curries, stir-fries and other dishes, sometimes incorporating large quantities of chili peppers and lime juice. Curries, stir-fries and others may be poured onto the rice creating a single dish called khao rat kaeng (Thai: ??????????), a popular meal when time is limited.Other varieties eaten in Thailand include: sticky rice (khao niao), a unique variety of rice which contains an unusual balance of the starches present in all rice, causing it to cook up to a sticky texture. Sticky rice, not jasmine rice, is the staple food in the local cuisines of Northern Thailand and of Isan (Northeastern Thailand), both regions of Thailand directly adjacent to Laos with which they share many cultural traits. Thai Red Cargo rice, an unpolished long grain rice with an outer deep reddish-brown colour and a white center, has a nutty taste and slightly chewy compared to the soft and gummy texture of jasmine rice. Only the husks of the red rice grains are removed which allows it to retain all its nutrients and vitamins, but unlike brown rice, its red color comes from antioxidants in the bran. Black sticky rice is a type of sticky rice with a deep purple-red color that may appear black. Another unpolished grain, black sticky rice has a rich nutty flavor that is most often enjoyed in desserts.Khanom chin, freshly made Thai rice noodlesNoodles are usually made from either rice flour, wheat flour or mung bean flour. Khanom chin is fresh rice vermicelli made from fermented rice, and eaten with spicy gravies like a green curry of chicken (khanom chin kaeng khiao wan kai). Flat rice noodles, adapted from Chinese cuisine to suit Thai taste, are called kuai tiao in Thailand and come in three varieties: sen yai are wide flat noodles, sen lek are thin flat rice noodles, and sen mi (also known as rice vermicelli in the West) are round and thin. Bami is made from egg and wheat flour and usually sold fresh, and are essentially similar to the Teochew mee pok. Wun sen, called cellophane noodles in English, are extremely thin noodles made from mung bean flour which are sold dried. noodle dishes, whether stir-fried like phat thai or in the form of a noodle soup, usually come as an individual serving and not meant to be shared and eaten communally.Pastes and sauces Pla thu (shortbodied mackerel) is often eaten together with nam phrik kapi.The ingredients found in almost all Thai dishes and every region of the country is nam pla, a very aromatic and strong tasting fish sauce. Fish sauce is a staple ingredient in Thai cuisine and imparts a unique character to Thai food. Fish sauce is prepared with fermented fish that is made into a fragrant condiment and provides a salty flavor. There are many varieties of fish sauce and many variations in the way it is prepared. Some fish may be fermented with shrimp and/or spices. Pla ra is also a sauce made from fermented fish. It is more pungent than nam pla, and, in contrast to nam pla which is a clear liquid, it is opaque and often contains pieces of fish. To use it in som tam (spicy papaya salad) is a matter of choice. Kapi, Thai shrimp paste, is a combination of fermented ground shrimp and salt. It is used, for instance, in red curry paste, in the famous chili paste called nam phrik kapi and in rice dishes such as khao khluk kapi. Tai pla is a sauce used in the Southern Thai cuisine made with the fermented innards of the shortbodied mackerel (pla thu).[22] It is one of the main condiments of kaeng tai pla curry and is also used to make nam phrik tai pla.[23]Nam phrik are Thai chilli pastes, similar to the Indonesian and Malaysian sambals. Each region has its own special versions. The words “nam phrik” are used by Thais to describe many pastes containing chilies used for dipping, although the more watery version tend to be called nam chim. Thai curry pastes are normally called phrik kaeng or khrueang kaeng (lit. curry ingredients) but some people also use the word nam phrik to designate a curry paste. Red curry paste, for instance, could be called phrik kaeng phet or khrueang kaeng phet in Thai, but also nam phrik kaeng phet. Both nam phrik and phrik kaeng are prepared by crushing together chillies with various ingredients such as garlic and shrimp paste using a mortar and pestle. Some nam phrik are served as a dip with vegetables such as cucumbers, cabbage and yard-long beans, either raw or blanched. One such paste is nam phrik num, a paste of pounded fresh green chilies, shallots, garlic and coriander leaves. The sweet roasted chili paste called nam phrik phao is often used as an ingredient in Tom yam or when frying meat or seafood, and it is also popular as a spicy “jam” on bread. The dry nam phrik kung, made with pounded dried prawns (kung haeng, Thai: ????????), is often eaten with rice and a few slices of cucumber.The soy sauces which are used in Thai cuisine are of Chinese origin and the Thai names for them are (wholly or partially) loanwords from the Teochew dialect: si-io dam (dark soy sauce), si-io khao (light soy sauce), and taochiao (fermented whole soy beans). Namman hoi (oyster sauce) is also of Chinese origin. It is used extensively in vegetable and meat stir-fries.
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